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News about Bradbury

Read the latest Bradbury news and access a selection of digital media for press or educational use.

Bradbury 100 at Caltech

PASADENA, California (Feb. 21-Mar. 1, 2020)

Caltech will honor the works of Ray Bradbury between February 21 and March 1, 2020 with a series of short, adapted, one-act plays from his works.

Los Angeles Times Book Prizes

LOS ANGELES, California. (Dec. 23, 2019)

On April 17, 2020, the Los Angeles Times Book Prizes in partnership with the Ray Bradbury Estate will announce the winner of the inaugural Ray Bradbury Book Prize for Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Speculative Fiction. The three-judge panel includes Tananarive Due, Kelly Link, and Tim Pratt.

NASA Mars Rover Begins Driving at Bradbury Landing

PASADENA, California. (August 22, 2012)

NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity has begun driving from its landing site, which scientists announced they have named for the late author Ray Bradbury.

Making its first movement on the Martian surface, Curiosity’s drive combined forward, turn and reverse segments. This placed the rover roughly 20 feet (6 meters) from the spot where it landed 16 days ago.

NASA has approved the Curiosity science team’s choice to name the landing ground for Ray, who was born 92 years ago today and died this year. The location where Curiosity touched down is now called Bradbury Landing.

“This was not a difficult choice for the science team,” said Michael Meyer, NASA program scientist for Curiosity. “Many of us and millions of other readers were inspired in our lives by stories Ray Bradbury wrote to dream of the possibility of life on Mars.”

1944 Retro-Hugo Awards Announced

DUBLIN, Ireland. (Aug. 16, 2019)

At a ceremony on the evening of Thursday, August 15, 2019, at the 77th World Science Fiction Convention in Dublin, the winners of the 1944 Retrospective Hugo Awards were announced. We’re delighted to announce that the award for the best short story went to Ray Bradbury for “King of the Gray Spaces” (later retitled “R Is for Rocket”) from his collection Famous Fantastic Mysteries, published in December 1943.

Bradbury would have been pleased at the company he kept in these retrospective awards. Best novella was won by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry for The Little Prince, and best long-form dramatic presentation went to the original movie Heaven Can Wait, written by Samson Raphaelson and directed by Ernst Lubitsch. Bradbury would also have been delighted and amused to learn that he’s still winning awards seven years after his passing. But then, he always did believe writing was a way to live forever.

Bios and photos

The following bios and photos are approved for press or educational use during the 2020 Centennial year. Click on each photo to download.

Short Biography

In a career that spanned more than seventy years, Ray Bradbury (1920–2012) inspired generations of readers in a wide variety of genres to dream, think, and create. A prolific author of more than four hundred published short stories and close to fifty books, as well as numerous poems, essays, plays, operas, teleplays, and screenplays, Bradbury is one of the most widely translated authors in the world and one of the most celebrated writers of our time. His enduring novels, novelized story cycles, and story collections include The Martian Chronicles, The Illustrated Man, The Golden Apples of the Sun, Fahrenheit 451, The October Country, Dandelion Wine, A Medicine for Melancholy, and Something Wicked This Way Comes. His stories appeared in the annual O. Henry Prize anthologies in two consecutive years and continue to appear in hundreds of textbooks for new generations of readers.

The worlds of film and television acknowledged Bradbury’s mastery of storytelling as well. Numerous feature films were based on his work, including It Came from Outer Space, The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms, Fahrenheit 451, Something Wicked This Way Comes, The Wonderful Ice Cream Suit, A Sound of Thunder, and The Illustrated Man, starring Rod Steiger. He wrote for the theater, cinema, and TV, including the screenplay for John Huston’s Moby Dick, and the Academy Award–nominated 1962 animated short film Icarus Montgolfier Wright, based on his short story. Bradbury won an Emmy for his 1993 screenplay for the TV animated feature film The Halloween Tree, based on his novel. The author also adapted sixty-five of his stories for the series The Ray Bradbury Theater, which garnered numerous awards for the production team. In addition, Bradbury’s stories were adapted for the popular series The Twilight Zone, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, and The Alfred Hitchcock Hour.

 

Long Biography

In a career that spanned more than seventy years, Ray Bradbury (1920–2012) inspired generations of readers in a wide variety of genres to dream, think, and create. A prolific author of more than four hundred published short stories and close to fifty books, as well as numerous poems, essays, plays, operas, teleplays, and screenplays, Bradbury was one of the most celebrated writers of our time. His enduring novels, novelized story cycles, and story collections include The Martian Chronicles (1950), The Illustrated Man (1951), The Golden Apples of the Sun (1953), Fahrenheit 451 (1953), The October Country (1955), Dandelion Wine (1957), A Medicine for Melancholy (1959), and Something Wicked This Way Comes (1962).

His many subsequent books include a juvenile fantasy, The Halloween Tree (1972); the detective novel trilogy, Death Is a Lonely Business (1985), A Graveyard for Lunatics (1990), and Let’s All Kill Constance (2003); his essay collection on creativity, Zen in the Art of Writing (1989); his roman-à-clef based on his work in Ireland with John Huston, entitled Green Shadows, White Whale (1992); the supernatural From the Dust Returned (2001); a collection of his poetry, They Have Not Seen the Stars (2001); Farewell Summer (2006), the nostalgic sequel to Dandelion Wine; and nine short story collections spanning the final five decades of his life. Two hundred of his best short stories were published in two one-hundred story collections, The Stories of Ray Bradbury (1980) and Bradbury Stories (2003). Bradbury’s stories have earned individual honors in two O. Henry Prize anthologies and four Best American Short Stories volumes and continue to appear in hundreds of textbooks for new generations of readers. He has become one of the most widely translated authors in many languages throughout the world.

Not surprisingly, Ray Bradbury’s gifts as a very visual master storyteller quickly extended into the world of film and television adaptation. He wrote the screenplay for John Huston’s classic 1956 film adaptation of Moby Dick, and his success with this challenging movie project opened many doors in Hollywood. He was nominated for a 1962 Academy Award, and he won an Emmy for his teleplay of The Halloween Tree in 1993. He adapted sixty-five of his stories for television’s The Ray Bradbury Theater, and his production team won numerous awards for this series. Bradbury stories were adapted for Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, and The Alfred Hitchcock Hour. Feature films based on Bradbury’s work include It Came from Outer Space (1953), The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms (1953), Fahrenheit 451 (1966 and 2018), The Illustrated Man (1969), Something Wicked This Way Comes (1983), The Wonderful Ice Cream Suit (1998), and A Sound of Thunder (2005).

Through his stories, books, articles, and countless lectures, Ray Bradbury was one of the most prominent visionaries and inspirational figures of the Space Age. His dreams became the dreams of astronomers, astronauts, planetary scientists, and mainstream readers of all ages. His Space-Age honors and recognitions include the “Dandelion” moon crater, named by the Apollo 15 crew in 1971; an asteroid designated “9766 Bradbury”; rocks on Mars named “The Martian Chronicles” by the Spirit and Opportunity Martian rover scientific teams; and the digital copy of The Martian Chronicles carried aboard the Phoenix lander to the high northern latitudes of Mars. One of the deepest chasms of the Martian Grand Canyon, Valles Marineris, has been unofficially named the “Bradbury Abyss”.

Ray Bradbury’s Earth-bound awards are no less meaningful. They include the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement, the SFWA Grand Master Award, and the Bram Stoker Award for Lifetime Achievement. In 2000 he was awarded the National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. Four years later, he received the National Medal of Arts from President George W. Bush. Bradbury’s 2007 Pulitzer Prize citation recognized his “prolific and deeply influential” career.

Ray Bradbury learned the writer’s craft in Los Angeles, and forged a special creative bond with the city and its international culture that spanned his long career as a master storyteller. He also maintained strong creative ties to the memories of his small-town Midwestern childhood in Waukegan, Illinois. Throughout his life, Bradbury liked to recount his Waukegan adventure with a carnival magician, Mr. Electrico, in 1932. At the end of his performance Electrico reached out to the twelve-year-old Bradbury, touched the boy with his energy-charged sword, and commanded, “Live Forever!” Bradbury later said, “I decided that was the greatest idea I had ever heard. I started writing every day. I never stopped.”

Other resources

To conduct more research on Bradbury, visit these trusted sources.

Center for Ray Bradbury Studies

The mission of the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies is to fully document, preserve, and provide public access to its large and diverse collection of Space-Age visionary author Ray Bradbury’s manuscripts, personal office, working library, correspondence, and a lifetime of his awards and mementos. The Center is a national archive located within Indiana University’s School of Liberal Arts (IUPUI).

Bradburymedia

Bradburymedia catalogues and reviews Ray Bradbury’s works in film, television, radio, and other media. It is the personal website of Dr. Phil Nichols of the University of Wolverhampton, who is an advisor to the Center for Ray Bradbury Studies.

Centennial information

For additional information relating to the Ray Bradbury Centennial and associated events, please email WS Productions, Inc. who is the advisor to the Ray Bradbury Literary Works, LLC.